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Full text of "Alexander von Humboldt"

270                          UFE OF
professorship in Jena, which he hoped would enable
him to marry in the course of the following year5 fre-
quently visited Weimar, where his betrothed was then
living with her sister, Fran von Beulwitz, and it was
in Weimar where he and Humboklt first met. Their
first meeting soon ripened into a more intimate
acquaintance,, which ended in one of the noblest friend-
ships,, exercising a beneficial influence on both. Two
natures, such as Schiller and Humboldt, conld not
fail soon to understand each other, and the desire for
a fruitful intellectual life subsequently induced Hum-
boldt to live several years in Jena. When he left
that place he remained in constant correspondence
with Schiller.
After Ms betrothal^ Humboldt^did not remain long
in Weimar and Erfurt, as he intended to pass through
a probationary course in Berlin, and then procure an
appointment in the government, after which he pur-
posed celebrating his marriage.
Among the other important acquaintances which
Humboldt must have made this winter, is that of
3T. A. Wolff The latter was at this time a newly-
risen star of archaeology in the university of Halle,
and passed through Erfurt at the period of Humboldt's
stay there.
We find it nowhere recorded -whether Humboldt
visited Gottingen this "winter, or how long he remained
there. In the summer of 1790 we find him in Berlin,
whither he returned after the completion of his studies
and of bis first travels, with the intention of entering
into the lists of public life. His brother Alexander
•was at the same time travelling through the Nether-
lands, France., and Germany., ia the company of
IForster.
"William could not have been pleased by this stay
in Berlin, as Frederic the Great had been succeeded
by a regent? who by no means followed in the foot-
steps of his predecessor. Immorality, wastefulness, a
reactionary, childish policy, and a hypocritical pietism,
were the order of the day. Society was demoralized